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Why Art Galleries Exist

What do you think of your gallery exhibition openings? What is the gap between how you view your art, versus how you explain your view of your art. It’s difficult because, after all, you chose visual art, a nonverbal, and now you have to explain it back into words. Some are glibber than others, but the universe of words fails to explain the universe of art.

Is the potential buyer looking for sofa art or soul art. Each is legitimate, and no one has to apologize. In reality, any piece of art will have to fulfill its aesthetic meaning as well as a deeper meaning. The needs of the artist and client must be filled. In the catholic world of art, explaining this distinction will establish the aim of THIS painting or sculpture.

Everyone will be happier if they understand the dynamics of the gallery opening. It’s an extrovert situation surrounded by walls of insight. In our hectic world, art should be a time for insight and reflection.

The ultimate purpose of a gallery and an opening is for a patron to end up with a piece of reflection (art) for a living room wall. It’s sofa congruence for some and soul congruence for others. Some want art that soothes. Others want psychic stimulation.

At first encounter, a piece of art is at odds with our world of linear thinking. Creative writing strives for immediate clarity in order to reach the reader’s unconscious. Art isn’t in such a hurry. It can stand initial ambiguity; great art reveals the collective unconscious to the individual. It’s not logical or linear, therefore doesn’t fit comfortable thinking.

It’s little wonder that the opening crowd doesn’t fully address the mysterious insights on the wall and goes for the known, “Let’s have a have a party.”

To counter all of the above, in the spirit of a “moment of silence,” I propose an Insight Five.” Introduce it as a party game. In a playful mood, request each person to quietly consider one piece of art for five minutes. Look for what is familiar about the art as well as any new insights gained.

After five minutes, they are free to exchange reflections if inclined, or just go back to the party.

Handled well, “Insight Five” can add a new dimension to an opening. Far from being a party pooper, a brief acknowledgement of the core reason, will be a welcome moment of introspection.

It’s a light way to introduce something very deep.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9345069

Making Garden Art and Statuary

download-13Think outdoor garden, and beautiful plants, ornamental trees, flowering shrubs and rolling lawns come to mind. The mind’s eye may not immediately envisage concrete statuary or even benches, pavers, stepping stones and the like.

However, any garden worth its name – be it in a small backyard or a sprawling turf – is quite incomplete without attractive concrete artworks. While statues, animal sculptures, gnomes, fairies, gargoyles and birdbaths add to the landscape and look quite becoming, other concrete items such as benches, urns, plaques and pavers are quite elementary to the garden scheme.

Indeed, the lush foliage of a garden gets an added charm and texture with garden art and statuary. Most of these items are cast in concrete as it is sturdy and durable.

This brings us to the question of first making molds for these concrete casts. Which mold making materials will be suitable for casting concrete? Let’s take a look:

Liquid latex rubber – This has emerged as the mold making material of choice for casting concrete garden articles. It is flexible, long-lasting, maintains details well and most importantly, can easily resist the abrasive nature of concrete. The cheap price and easy availability further adds to the preference of using latex rubber. It is generally used for making larger pieces.

Polyurethanes – Latex rubber comes with one major drawback. Making the mold is a lengthy and cumbersome process involving repetitive coats of the liquid latex (at least 12 to 15 coats) with long breaks in between to allow every successive coat to dry. This is why many mold makers prefer to use polyurethanes for the task. It may be a bit expensive and necessitates application of a mold release also, but the ease and speed of use coupled with the low set time work in its favor. However, polyurethanes are still preferred for making molds of small pieces only.

Silicone rubber – This is another suitable mold making product, put the high cost limits its use for small items such as plaques only.

Concrete casts

Once the molds are ready, it is time to move to casting concrete. Use weather-proof concrete mix and dilute it with water to get the desired consistency. Slowly pour the concrete into the mold in a long and thin stream to avoid air bubbles as much as possible. Tap it around or shake the mold a bit to bring any remaining air bubbles to the surface.

Once all the trapped air is popped, allow the cast to cure for a day or two. The concrete will slowly harden to form a solid and durable cast that can be immediately installed outside in the garden.

However, it is advisable to seal the porous concrete with an appropriate sealant such as latex rubber, polyurethane, epoxy or acrylic. This will also protect your artwork from cracking in the long run.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9365904

How to Become a Model – 4 Versatile Tips

When you are first starting out, you will face a very intense competition. It is about how to keep up with others, how to keep up the pace, and most importantly and I cannot stress this enough, is how you have to be different from others, in a good way. If you are outstanding and unique, chances are, you are more likely to be chosen for projects. So the following are some pointers as to how you can become a model, hopefully a versatile one.

1) Keeping fit and staying in good shape

You cannot always eat what you want to eat; you need to ponder about your diet to make sure you stay in shape. A few pounds heavier could shun off potential projects and that is the last thing you want. Modeling agencies and their clients look for models who are fit and in shape, so that they will be suitable to appeal to the big crowd. Moreover, keeping fit and maintaining a good shape will increase your versatility in landing projects. You could be on a fashion runway, sporting commercial and even projects which involve promoting healthy lifestyle; this is why it is so important to stay fit.

2) Be cool about facing ups and downs

The modeling path is always not going to be a smooth-sailing; you will face all sorts of people, events and scenarios. Harsh criticism, rejections and disapprovals will be inevitable, but in reality, you just have to swallow it down and continue improving. Be tough, stay strong and listen to feedback to improve or survive in this industry. Once you have experienced all sorts of drama, nothing will scare you anymore, and that is how you increase your versatility because you are willing to listen to advice/comments and accomplish the task required.

3) Enrich your life and broaden your horizon

To become a model and especially a unique art piece, you need to experience and learn different things that can distinguish yourself from the rest. If you are into sports and exercising, try out different sports, go for the extreme and even the common ones, learn them, know the basics, and know how the game is played. If you are into fashion, learn about the different brands, or learn about the various types of design and the latest trend. The possibilities are limitless and sky-high, so go for it, expose yourself to different platforms, allow your inner soul to be immersed and share the experiences. Trust me, you will not regret.

4) Maintain your appearance

Your hair, your skin and your teeth, etc are some of the most important physical appearances for you to appeal to the clients and the general public. Imagine a model with unkempt and poor hair condition, small breakouts and blemishes on her face and untidy teeth with plaque. How can he or she score projects with such untidy shape? So maintain your appearance, keep your face flawless, tidy up your hair and practice good oral hygiene, because that is how you appeal and stand out.

Just to sum up, of course I am not saying that these pointers will guarantee you to become a model or even a mainstream one, but it is better than nothing right? At least I hope that you have gain some insights about how to become a model from this article and also the fact that modeling is not as easy as you think. Bear in mind, be bold, be unique and be special.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9383342

Artistic Decisions and the Flow of Energy

Indecision

Indecision stops the flow of creative energy and prevents an artist’s vision from taking shape. It fills us with low-order ideas and points us in numerous unproductive directions.

Fear causes indecision and paralyzes us from moving forward. It prevents us from committing to specific ideas and making efforts in certain directions. Fear leads to second-guessing, doubts about our abilities, undermines our desire for creative expression.

The creative clog in our minds caused by indecision and fear eventually overflows and becomes a dispersal of creative thought that wastes good ideas and motivations in solid artistic directions.

Challenging artistic creations that have a daring edge to them can sometimes shock us and cause us to hesitate from bringing them to completion. Fear of transmitting this shocking effect to others and the way we imagine their resultant opinions about our new ideas, which could be our best work is another form of artistic indecision, which stems from the fear of hurting or offending others with ideas, manners, or through the violation of a societal norm.

Decision

Decision opens our mental valves to allow the flow of creativity to fill our works of art. To maintain a steady flow of creative energy you’ll have to constantly be making decisions that will help you progress through each project.

Little decisions can be made almost instantaneously, while big decisions will have to be carefully formed over a period of time. For the sake of actually achieving your artistic vision, postponing the project may be a valid option to prevent a big decision from being made hastily since this can bring everything we’ve worked on to ruin.

In music, decisions must be made regarding the shape of a melodic line, the number of instruments to be used, and the arrangement of the parts. In cooking, the decisions will focus on the type of ingredients, their proportions, and the visual presentation. In illustration, the colors, type of paper, and subject will have to be decided upon before and during the entire process until the project is complete. In every creative field, the artist or designer must be able to operate by making a consistent stream of decisions without end or hesitation.

Openness of Mind

A cloud of unknowing can be filled with innumerable factors related to the realization of our artistic vision, such as doubt and fear, which can prevent a decision from getting made. This is why a Zen-like attitude about creative work must be cultivated in every one of us, so as to keep our artistic energy in a constant state of flow.

Living itself can have an artistic quality to it if the person doing it approaches life with a signature, personalized style.
With an openness of mind that doesn’t attempt to regulate the flow of artistic energy, it becomes easier to assess all the factors which must be considered for inclusion or removal from any one of our works.

A mindset that doesn’t take into account the critical opinions of others finds that it is much smoother to sift through the elements of a piece so that they coalesce naturally into the artistic structure we were seeking or not seeking, but surprised us by evolving out of the process.

The more the decision-making process takes on the characteristic of a smooth flowing stream of artistic expression unregulated by social conventions, the doubt and fear will dissipate and the power of choice will operate naturally and with ease.

When the artist is able to assume an openness of mind the speed of artistic creation will accelerate and bring them quickly to the completion of every project. The fulfillment of your creative vision will simply flow and always be readily available.

So when the final pieces of a creative puzzle fall into place, and what was once a cloud of uncertainty encircling you, dissipates, and solidifies into a tangible product, the flow of living energy from you will slow and once again return to a restful state. From this point of rest you will be free to refresh yourself in other activities or begin again to follow the course of new art work.

Marc Avante is a musician, sound designer, and blogger. He is also the founder of the music project called Stereo Thesis. Stereo Thesis is a prototype sound design and music studio.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9427147

Intensity of Emotion in Art

download-14The intensity of emotion is best expressed by using the dynamic methods of an art form. Every creative subject has its own formalized approaches for dynamic usage, but in general dynamics are tools we can use as options for increasing or decreasing the amount of emotion flowing between artist and audience.

The flow of emotion through art is a two-way flow occurring between two terminals – the artist’s mind and the audience’s mind. The flow is smooth when the emotional impact sends a feedback signal that is regular and consistent, but rough and jagged when inconsistencies cause disturbances to the balance of smoothness. Both of these effects change by manipulating the types of emotions in question with their artistic dynamic equivalents.

The emotional impact of a dynamic component can be altered in one of two basic categories: suddenly and gradually.

A sudden impact will manifest as a punch or direct influence with no subtlety about it, but sometimes it will occur as a harmonious and seamless emergence within a work of art. In contrast, a gradual emotional impact will usually seem to come from a far distance or an unexpected angle by slowly drawing an increasing amount of the audience’s attention to it for a pleasing surprise.

Using dynamics as a diagnostic tool is a way of testing, measuring, and adjusting the intensity of emotion in an art form.

Gradual change or a sudden impact basically comprise all types of dynamic categories, but it’s the combination, structure and timing of each of these elements that alter the distribution of emotional intensity in creative work.

By pushing some dynamic factors to extremes and reducing others to levels where you’d hardly notice their presence, you begin to get a feel for how each factor will interact with every other factor you’re using.

Here are a few dynamic components that an artist must control in any of their creative works that give them the power to alter the intensity of emotion as well as the emotional impact that is in their product.

Color

Texture

Volume

Depth

Balance

Timing

Tone

Grammar

Velocity

Style

Flavor

Harmony

Shape

Size

Height

Melody

Line

In whatever manner an artist uses dynamic components to generate new and unique artistic experiences, it is very important that the work expresses a clear statement and definite idea that is truly the artist’s creative vision. A simple concept, short phrase, ingredient list, color scheme, or dramatic theme are all great places to start.

Once you’ve got a basis or foundation from which to grow and build a composition, it’s easy to begin testing different dynamic components to determine the results of each experiment. Note taking can be extremely helpful and invaluable during this part of the process so as to trace your line of progress.

The process will soon accelerate and bring you even closer to the end product. Each line of progress will reveal some new element, an interesting combination of factors, or an unusual result that can be re-created and explored at a later time.

One of the most important keys to forming successful pieces of art is by illustrating in its structure how the result developed or grew. The combination of elements should form a harmony or balance of factors that seem like they couldn’t have existed apart from each other or that they somehow always belonged together.

Ultimately, the goal of experimenting with various dynamic elements is to make discoveries through unexpected surprises, marvelous accidents, or clever feats of chance that couldn’t have been planned in advance. This is the realm of game-changing artistic products, which are truly ground-breaking, and that usher in “the new” and set trends.

Every artistic idea possesses a little piece of the artist himself and becomes imbued with part of their life energy. This is part of the alchemy of creative work, where the artist extends himself into the work of art and the piece begins to take on a life of its own.

Marc Avante is a musician, sound designer, and blogger. He is also the founder of the music project called Stereo Thesis. Stereo Thesis is a prototype sound design and music studio.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9427153

How to Buy Art, Tips and Tricks

– Find an artist who makes what appeals to you. Look on the internet, there are various online platforms. Visit galleries or art markets. Ask around. Looking at art repeatedly will help you to determine what you really like.

– Do you have financial space to spend money on art? Just how much are you able and willing to pay?

– If you do not have the financial resources, is there something else you can trade with the artist of your choice? Perhaps you can repair her car or help him with some book-keeping, help install an exhibition, take professional pictures of the works or swap goods you make.

– Buying directly from the artist really gives you your money’s worth. You avoid having to pay a broker.

– Ask the artist to show you some of his older pieces that might be in his way. Should you find something of your liking the benefit is mutual: the artist gains space in his studio with the knowledge that his work is appreciated by someone and you will have it at a very competitive price.

– Inform if the artist accepts payment by installments. Most artists will embrace this. Their work is sold, somebody likes it enough to buy it and they receive money.

– Check out second-hand shops in order to stumble across a work you like and when you find something, buy it immediately.

– Search for a place where you can borrow fine art. Having something particular in your house for a while enables you to discover what you like.

– Ask a familiar artist if you can lease a piece of art temporarily and arrange a discount price in case you like to keep it.

– Ask an artist to make something on assignment to your own design or for a special place.

– Ask money for your birthday, wedding or anniversary to enable you to buy art. If you tell people about your plan they will be reassured you will turn their money into a lasting memory.

– Befriend an artist. You might be the first to see his/her new work, you could get a discount and perhaps he/she will present you with something on a special occasion.

– Buy from a female artist. That is (regrettably for me) cheaper than buying from a man. This does mean you will get better value for the same price.

– Last but not least, just buy something that really touches you. This might not be the most accessible work, but it will stand the test of time brilliantly.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9459343

The Life of a Statue

The statues that I make start in a dimension between awakening and sleeping. Somewhere at a certain moment they are inside my hand and I draw them or they instantly find their way into clay or another material. And then they’re there. New statues, not yet finished at once. Something still has to be done. A cheek or a leg is not yet completed. Perhaps the basic shape is all right, but the skin needs some attention. Something still irritates and itches. So the statue has to wait until I am ready to see the right things and make the right changes. At a certain moment it has gained its own reason for existence, away from me. When it is a good sculpture, I will be surprised as well as another viewer. The sculpture will tell its own story, more complete than I intended when I was making it.

And then the moment comes when the statue is finished. All set to dry or be abraded or polished, due to the material I worked with.

The statue lives in my studio for a while. Covered by a bag and a piece of cloth. Or just naked between other statues in the making or almost finished. In my universe, in my breath, in my attention. Amongst friends and acquaintances, in the ballet of my hands. Until it is finished. Then it will be photographed (for the books) and put into a box to wait for an exhibition or a presentation.

At an exhibition the statues are in balance with each other and the surrounding work. Each piece getting the space it needs, with the right lighting, with an opponent who can handle it and is able to make it radiate. An ideal situation. People who come to visit, see the work in all its beauty.

And they buy it. The statue is coming home where it belongs. In a new environment surrounded by unfamiliar and strange novelties. And here the new owners also create the ideal situation, only in a completely different way, in a new universe with diverse life forms. Here the statue tells its story with a contrasting hue in a new light. Nuances move, the foundation born between awakening and sleeping remains forever. Everywhere.

Some sculptures will eventually be sold to museums, public spaces where they will be cared for and explained to many passers-by. Every now and then someone will be enchanted by the whisper from a strange universe and will recognize a part of his own heart.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9458338

Influence of Industrialism on Arts

download-15Engineering, technology, and industrialization have made our lives much better. There is no doubt about that. They have transformed our society and for better or worse, they have also changed the way we perceive and admire Arts and Artisan’s efforts around us. But, to what extent?

Everything that modern man uses has been manufactured en masse and Information technology have made Earth a global village. People can interact with each other thousands of miles away in sub-seconds and travel around the world in a matter of hours. So, they have a faster and direct access to what is being expressed in the form of art and literature. That has changed things a lot too.

There were some art forms that were transformed with the advent of modern machines. Camera photography gave people the unprecedented ability to capture any moment instantaneously. When photography was invented in 1830, painters felt threatened by the new invention. They eventually distinguished Arts form from Photography and began to experiment with impressionism, abstract arts, surrealism and other forms of modern painting concepts that were partly fueled by industrialism and the new social settings in an industrial world. Another significant impact of the Industrial and Information Revolutions was the invention of products like the tube paint. As tube paints are collapsible, their invention made artists more mobile. It resulted in a better outreach of art.

With the advent of photographs and movie reels, a different art category emerged that has since overshadowed the rest in terms of popularity and mass appeal. It is the art of motion pictures and animation. It is the simplicity and mass appeal of this relatively new sensation that transcended all boundaries and made us fall in love with it. Now you didn’t need to understand a particular art form to be able to admire it. It also resulted in a decreased interest in other forms of expressive art.

The internet and communication revolution also brought a lot of changes into our lives and eliminated many boundaries. Recently, various art forms have thrived due to this increased connectivity and brought fame to artists from around the world. They have become richer and more recognized in public while inspiring new talents to come through.

On the downside, industrialism and connectivity has fueled our materialistic nature and decreased appreciation for harder-to-understand topics. But, despite all that, it has made artists and art better recognized around the world. The future is bright if we see it in the right light!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9403886

Hobby Or Profession?

Whenever I tell people that I am a sculptor they ask me if I can get an income out of it. Their second question is how I turned my hobby into my job. Another rather funny question is how I make time for this. I seldom think about that but occasionally I look at my work, at the amount and I just know how many hours I spend on each sculpture. This is what I do, my life’s ambition, my profession. I am a sculptor, I make sculptures. I devote my time and my life to this.

People never ask a professional athlete how much time his sport occupies or how he changed his hobby into his job. You just know that. He is a professional athlete so he already made that choice and will dedicate all his time to it. All his future decisions will be dependent on his choice to become a professional athlete. It is the reason for his doing or not doing certain things. And that choice can only be made after spending 10.000 hours practicing your sport to discover whether you’re talented enough. I once heard people say about Sven Kramer that he wasn’t all that talented but had enormous will power.

It is the same for professional artists, for true craftsmen. Once you’ve made that decision, the consequences will reveal themselves. And I remember the exact moment I took that resolution. For me that means a continuous study of forms, I will always work from my heart. I will submerge myself in what touches people and capture it in my sculptures. The foundation of my work is my bewilderment and surprise about man and the world he creates. I am honest and open.

It also means I have to go along my own path, I cannot be part of the heap. I observe humanity and feel the impact it has on me. I try to translate that into my work. I look at society from the side line. But of course I am also part of society and have to meet the demands of that society to be able to keep my occupation. To get by (yes, it’s my livelihood, of course it’s my livelihood, otherwise I wouldn’t be able to stand in front of you). But I need to be able to do lots of other things as well. I must be capable to build a website, negotiate prices, hit the market, search for customers, do public relations, keep a portfolio, know my position with reference to other artists. But the bottom line, the reason I need to learn all those things are my sculptures. That is the consequence of my heart’s acceptance.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9499702

Shading Techniques in Art

Shading is the technique of showing tones or values on an object through gradual gradations for it to look ‘solid’ and have a three dimensional effect. Shading techniques allow you to weave layer upon layer of pencil marks to add a convincing form to your line drawing. Shading adds a sense of substance to your subject and produces a convincing tonal relationship. Drawings take on a three dimensional form when shaded properly.

To render shades correctly on drawn objects, the artist must carefully observe the source of light that is striking various values of tones or shades on the drawn objects. After realizing the source of light, the artist must study closely the reflections of the light on areas of the objects to know the lightest and darkest sections. After establishing the endpoints or extremes thus the lightest valued areas as well as the darkest valued areas, the remaining area with a mid-half tone between the two extremes is the middle value.

The tones are adjusted as many times to make it look realistic. It is advised that artists step back periodically to look at the drawing and the subject in a distance to view and adjust the tones accordingly. This would make the values depicted on the drawn objects more realistic. In the rendition of cast shadow, the artist must take note of the light source and the striking or reflection of the light on the objects. If the light is far above, the shorter the shadow is (try checking out your shadow at noon – 12:00PM) whereas the lower the light, the longer the cast shadow will become. The rule is that the darker the shadow, the brighter the light source. As the shadow is drawn further from the object, the lighter it becomes. The shadow takes on the shape of the item it comes from. Notice that to make the shadow, all you have to do is create a triangular shape from the top of the object to the ground and back to the base of the object. According to the light source, make your shadow fit accordingly.

There are various ways of rendering shades on a drawn object. Some of these are:

1. Hatching: This is a shading technique that employs one set of line either vertical, curved or horizontal lines in rendering shades on a drawn object. These lines are drawn beside one another to give the illusion of a value. Depending on the hatching shading effect one want to achieve, the artist may decide to make the individual lines in hatching sets far apart or close together.

2. Cross-hatching: This is a shading technique made by the use of lines that crosses each other at an angle in rendering shades on an object. In cross-hatching, one set of line crosses over (overlaps) another set of line to create a shade on a drawn object.

3. Stippling/Dottilism/Pointillism: This is a shading technique that employs dots or series of points in rendering the shades on an object.

4. Circularism/Squirkling/Scribbling: This is the use of circles, squirkles and scribbles in rendering a shade on an object. When squirkle sets have noticeable spaces between the lines, they work beautifully for shading various textures, such as fuzzy fabrics and curly hair. Squirkles can look like a solid tone when the lines are drawn closely together, and are great for shading lots of different aspects of people, including skin tones.

5. Tonal gradation/smudging: This is the rendering of soft tones on a drawn object and blending the tones together with the thumb, a piece of paper or a soft cloth.

Rendering shades on objects using any marking or drawing tool is an interesting practical exercise in art. However, to achieve successes, artists must learn the rudiments in shading so as to render shade on drawn objects based on the accepted rubrics of art.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9508066